Regression

The Role of Women and Magic in Ancient Times

hathor_magician_tattoos_1024
Showing neck tattoo of 2 seated baboons facing a wadjet-eye above mirrored wadjet-eyes

Archaeology can be a stuffy subject to read about or it can conjure up images of adventure Indiana Jones style – but mainly it has been a male-dominated field where women in history have been marginalised and vilified. This article isn’t about that but I never realised the epic proportions of this until I started doing past life regression.

Case in point… the discovery of tattooed female mummies in Egypt (and other places too like Africa and Mongolia), the most famous of these being Amunet [1,2], Priestess of the Goddess Hathor who was discovered in 1891. Sadly, the French Egyptologist who discovered her dismissed her as a woman of low status, probably a prostitute or ‘dancing girl’ or maybe a royal concubine because she was found at the site of royal/high status burials [3]. I wonder if it occurred to him that she might have been there as a woman in her own right? She was covered in many tattoos of lotus blossoms, wadjet-eyes [4], seated baboons [5] and snakes which were seen as quite sensual (because snakes are erotic? hence the prostitute inference) but of course, at the time when she was discovered, curved table legs were also considered sensual so one must view their reaction in context to their Victorian values.

This is the bit that made my heart beat faster… these are also magical symbols.

wadjet

“Any angle that you look at this woman, you see a pair of divine eyes looking back at you,” bioarchaeologist Anne Austin of Stanford University explained at a meeting of anthropologists in 2016.

Snakes are often pictured on magical items and the wadjet-eye’s magical context is well documented. The seated baboons could be related to Thoth [5], a god well known for his baboonuse of magic. Furthermore, the combination of the seated Thoth-baboons and wadjet-eye in a magical context is well attested since the Middle Kingdom (ca. 1550 – 1069 BCE) when it started to be used on ivory wands and other magical objects.

All the other tattoos on her body seem to be connected to a kind of magic associated with the idea of power and divine action. The placement of the permanent tattoos on her body would not only have linked her with the divine through Hathoric symbolism, but also empowered her to take on important magical roles – for example the wadjet-eyes on her neck may have enhanced her ability to cast spells and give magical powers to her speech.

I have had many lives in Ancient Egypt but also Atlantis, Africa and Mongolia where I have served as priestess, magician, herbalist or witch and shaman. I have come across many clients who have had similar lives. In one case, I had a client who saw herself as a priestess in Egypt performing a ceremony which she described in detail and also those attending, in particular a man wearing an Anubis mask who then went on to process down the river on a flat-bottomed boat as she watched from the river bank. Imagine my astonishment when, a few days later, I regressed a man who described the same ceremony but he was the man in the Anubis mask! I had another client who saw himself as a trainee magician and as part of his training he had to hike to a remote cabin up a mountain where he studied an ancient Grimoire [7]. I asked him if he could see what was written in the book and he told me it was mainly maths and pictures of cones and vortices. It was explaining how to harness energy and project it at objects. He then went into the woods where he practised ‘throwing energy balls’ at trees, breaking off branches. Sometimes clients can vividly describe broaches or amulets and I’ve even seen wands I’ve used in the past enhanced with crystals.

So to come back to the arrogant Egyptologists of the past – women did indeed hold positions of power and were revered and even feared in ancient times. My favourite life is one where I was a Mongolian herbalist/healer and a much-loved member of the community. It is also sadly, the only life of many that I’ve seen where I lived to a ripe old age and died of natural causes. In the other lives I’ve been driven mad by the powerful magic (more than once – took me a while to learn!) and I’ve been driven out, hunted, tortured, drowned, burned etc. – the history books are full of these stories. It is also not surprising that in this life I am an Ayurvedic Therapist – Ayurveda being the ancient medicinal system of India, practiced for more than 75,000 years.

If you would like to explore your life as a woman or man with magical powers, please let me know as I’m building a portfolio and doing some research into this. We are once again beginning to understand that that which is seen is but a fraction of the world around us. We are coming back to energy and spirit and our ancient roots where we felt the connectedness of all living things both here on earth and the cosmos. Everything is energy and vibration. The scientific community is excited about ‘discovering’ this – but the old souls amongst us have always known this.

[1] https://www.sciencealert.com/egypt-council-of-antiquities-announces-deir-el-madina-tattooed-religious-women-hathor

[2] https://journals.openedition.org/bifao/296?lang=en

[4] Wadjet-eye
The Eye of Horus  is an ancient Egyptian symbol of protection, royal power, and good health. (The Eye of Horus is similar to the Eye of Ra, which belongs to a different god, Ra, but represents many of the same concepts. Wikipedia)
[5] Thoth-baboon
The baboon was a sacred animal to the ancient Egyptians. In ancient Egypt, the baboon, and dog were sacred animals closely associated with the god of wisdom, Thoth, who is also the deity associated with science, systems of writing, arts, and magic. It is written in several ancient texts that Thoth wrote a major work of scriptural importance that would one day be found.  The 42 Books of Thoth [6] are said to contain all the wisdom of the ancients and describe the instructions for achieving immortality plus 2 more books kept separately.  Unfortunately, most of the hermetic works were allegedly lost during the burning of the royal libraries in Alexandria.
[7] Grimoire
A grimoire is a textbook of magic, typically including instructions on how to create magical objects like talismans and amulets, how to perform magical spells, charms and divination, and how to summon or invoke supernatural entities… (Wikipedia)